setup sendmail

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Basher52
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setup sendmail

Post by Basher52 » Tue May 29, 2007 6:09 am

I've been trying for a long time to setup sendmail to work with a domain name but I just can't get it to work. I've read, don't know how many howto's and maunals but it just won't work.
I've also seen other system to use instead of asendmail that is supposed to be better(don't know how though, one said it had better security) but they won't work either.
All this makes me think that it's my fault and that I'm totally incompetent :P

Is there a utility or something that can help me with everything that need to be changed? a GUI of some sort, or something else.
I've heard that it's a pain to set this up and I can agree.

I want to get this to work before I actually buy the domain and I've seen on no-ip.biz that you under the 'Mail Options' can set the MX Record so I figured this can be a good test.

I know sendmail is a nice little program that can help me send OUT mails, but I also want it to work accepting mails.

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Post by Void Main » Tue May 29, 2007 6:21 am

This is actually quite simple. As mentioned you need to set your MX record for the domain to point to the host running sendmail. Then there are just a couple of configuration files that need to be modified in /etc/mail. I usually add my mail host name and domain to the "local-host-names" file and make a couple of tweaks to "sendmail.mc" after which you restart the sendmail service so the configs/maps are regenerated. One notable thing is by default in the sendmail.mc it is configured to listen on your loopback adapter only (127.0.0.1). Comment this line out with a "dnl". Also, this is on a Fedora system with the default sendmail and sendmail-cf packages installed. If you aren't running Fedora there may be other defaults that need to be changed on your system. Of course you also want to make sure you aren't blocking incoming traffic on port 25 via iptables.

I would also ask if you are trying to do this with a dynamic IP address and whether your ISP is filtering incoming port 25 traffic. If you are on a dynamic IP be aware that you are probably going to be on the RBL list through no fault of your own.

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Post by cdhgold » Tue May 29, 2007 9:27 am

sendmail does the sending you need something like dovecot for pop3/imap to do the receiving

i use dovecot for incoming mail and sendmail for outgoing mail for my pop3/imap server on RHEL4 system

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Post by Void Main » Tue May 29, 2007 10:15 am

cdhgold wrote:sendmail does the sending you need something like dovecot for pop3/imap to do the receiving

i use dovecot for incoming mail and sendmail for outgoing mail for my pop3/imap server on RHEL4 system
Incorrect. sendmail is the sender/receiver (mta/smtp agent that listens on port 25). Dovecot is for pop/imap access which you use after the mail has already arrived on your mail server via some smtp agent. In fact if you are going to read your mail right on the server that recieves it there is no need for pop/imap access. I'm pretty sure he's talking about the SMTP portion at this point though since he's trying to set up his MX record. That may very well be his next question after getting incoming mail working though. :)

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Post by cdhgold » Tue May 29, 2007 10:53 am

thanks for the correction

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Post by Basher52 » Tue May 29, 2007 12:10 pm

My scenario is like this.

My connection is not ADSL so I have no modem for that.
I have a RJ45 outlet in the wall were I get 10Mbit FD and my ISP have no responsibility for any virus checking or to ban any ports at all so everything is wide open unless I say so.

Just to cut cost I'm gonna have only one server for all applications and that is: iptables, mail server, and later a web server.
I know that to put a mail server on the same hardware as a web server is not very good practise, but what can an old poor guy do :P

I want to be able to use some client like Thunderbird (or Outlook Xpress :evil: ) to connect to the server and read/send mail, this is due to the fact that my sister has to be able to read/send mail from the server later when it's "in production".

I want to use the best protocol for sending/receiving mail and I always figured that to be smtp, but what do I know :P

The server itself are just gonna be standing somewhere without much attention unless something happens, so everything has to be accessable by clients on other machines and I guess that 'sis' won't let me install other OS than Windoze for them.

Eventhough I've read alot of configuring all these things I just can't get a grasp of all the vocabulary and what they really stand for, so this thing you said about "to point to the host running sendmail" is that the IP address of my server you're talking about?
I also know that I have to configure 'bind' to setting the domain name up etc. and a buddy at work said that this is essential to get sendmail to work, but I don't know if he by that ment when I've bought the domain and not just in this testing phase.

The MX Record I was talking about is due to the fact that I for now don't own a domain so I figured I would use this free no-ip.biz to setup a domain name and I was thinking I had to forward these MX records to my server's IP address, or am I way off?

Hope this will clear things up :)

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Post by Void Main » Tue May 29, 2007 6:04 pm

Basher52 wrote:My connection is not ADSL so I have no modem for that.
I have a RJ45 outlet in the wall were I get 10Mbit FD and my ISP have no responsibility for any virus checking or to ban any ports at all so everything is wide open unless I say so.
As I said, the big question would be whether or not the IP address you use on your server is a static IP address or a dynamic IP address. If it's static then you should be golden. If it's dynamic you are going to have many problems, believe me, I know from experience. You will have 2 major problems. The first is every time your IP address changes you'll have to change your MX record (or have some dynamic way of changing it via dyndns, noip, etc). The bigger problem is that you will likely be part of many RBL lists because you are in a dynamic IP range and many mail services and companies will automatically block you or if they don't block you they will throw you in the spam bucket.
Just to cut cost I'm gonna have only one server for all applications and that is: iptables, mail server, and later a web server.
I know that to put a mail server on the same hardware as a web server is not very good practise, but what can an old poor guy do :P
There is no problem setting this up like you want.
I want to be able to use some client like Thunderbird (or Outlook Xpress :evil: ) to connect to the server and read/send mail, this is due to the fact that my sister has to be able to read/send mail from the server later when it's "in production".
Once you get mail coming into your server you would install dovecot for this as cghgold mentioned earlier. This is an extremely simple step as all you really have to do is install the package and don't really have to configure anything.
I want to use the best protocol for sending/receiving mail and I always figured that to be smtp, but what do I know :P
Not only is smtp the best, it's the standard and pretty much your only option. That's what everyone else on the net uses for transferring mail between email servers. sendmail provides smtp as I mentioned.
The server itself are just gonna be standing somewhere without much attention unless something happens, so everything has to be accessable by clients on other machines and I guess that 'sis' won't let me install other OS than Windoze for them.
No problem, as mentioned dovecot provides standard pop/imap access which nearly all email clients understand.
Eventhough I've read alot of configuring all these things I just can't get a grasp of all the vocabulary and what they really stand for, so this thing you said about "to point to the host running sendmail" is that the IP address of my server you're talking about?
Yes, you would configure your MX record in DNS to point to the server running sendmail listening on port 25 for incoming messages. Basically you should have an 'A' record configured in your domain for your mail host (mail.yourdomain.com) and the MX record would use that name along with a priority (e.g. '10'). MX records can have more than one host and you set a different priority for each. That way if one is down it will go to the second one. You are only going to have one server though so it doesn't matter what you set the priority to.
I also know that I have to configure 'bind' to setting the domain name up etc. and a buddy at work said that this is essential to get sendmail to work, but I don't know if he by that ment when I've bought the domain and not just in this testing phase.
Actually if you purchase your domain from a registrar like GoDaddy you don't have to run your own DNS (bind) server. You can register all your hosts (including your MX record) in their DNS server which is what I would suggest you do. I have several domains registered with GoDaddy. They are one of the cheapest I know of for domain registrations (well, for .com, .net, and .org anyway).
The MX Record I was talking about is due to the fact that I for now don't own a domain so I figured I would use this free no-ip.biz to setup a domain name and I was thinking I had to forward these MX records to my server's IP address, or am I way off?
So you are not going to register your own domain? No problem, especially if you have a dynamic IP address as I said. no-ip.biz would provide dynamic address updates as long as you are running an update client. They also should have a way to set your MX record. In this case you would have a name like:

basher52.no-ip.biz

You would set your MX to basher52.no-ip.biz (or it may default to that if you don't specifically set it). Then when someone sends a message to basher@basher52.no-ip.biz the sending mail server will look up the MX record for 'basher52.no-ip.biz' and find that the message should be delivered to the server by the same name and as long as you have sendmail running listening on port 25 on your public IP address and it isn't being blocked then the message should arrive in the user basher's mailbox on your server.
Hope this will clear things up :)
Perfectly other than still not knowing if you have a dynamic address and what distro you are running (I could have you running quickly if you are running Fedora, only because I have configured this same setup you are trying to achieve at least 100 times). As a matter of fact, I have voidmain.is-a-geek.net running on a dynamic cable IP address and have the host registed through dyndns.org (like no-ip). If you send a message to voidmain@voidmain.is-a-geek.net I will get it on my server running sendmail that is listing on port 25 on that address, and then in turn read it in my email client using imap to read the mail on the server. I currently have everything here at home on Fedora Core 6.

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Post by Basher52 » Wed May 30, 2007 12:54 am

:oops: I seem to have forgotten the distro

Since the server is for a webshop later on, I don't need the cutting edge of FC. Someone told me to use CentOS (for now 4.4) which is the same as Redhat Enterprise and should be more stable.

In this test phase I will be on a Dynamic IP, but when I buy the Domain it WILL have a static IP, and this will mean that something will change in the setup, right?

The name of the domain is Swedish and ends with .se and is in use today on their webhost. This has to mean that I need my own DNS, right?
I haven't seen any host here in Sweden that allow you to just have a domain name and nothing else, and it looks like I'm gonna have the server at my place and a connection of its own.

As you see, I'm about to cut their cost and make it even better by moving out of M$, IIS, Exchange etc and into the world of Linux :P

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Post by Void Main » Wed May 30, 2007 6:30 am

I personally have never touched CentOS but I do also deal with Red Hat ES and AS, all versions (which the later versions are just snapshots of Fedora). At any rate the procedures are the same on both Red Hat, Fedora (and CentOS I presume) for configuring this stuff. I don't see any problem doing anything you mention.

The only question is once you move to your new domain whether you'll need to run your own DNS server or not. How will you go about registering your .se domain? Do they have the option of providing DNS services for your domain or "must" you run your own DNS server? Either way this is easy too.

First thing is first, you need to make sure you have the "sendmail" and "sendmail-cf" packages installed:

$ rpm -qa | grep sendmail

Then you need to modify your sendmail.mc and local-host-names in your /etc/mail directory. If you post the contents of your existing sendmail.mc I can show you what needs to be changed and put it up in my files directory for you to download. Then it's just a matter of enabling and starting sendmail:

# chkconfig sendmail on
# service sendmail restart

Check your /var/log/maillog file for errors then send an email message from an outside email account to a user on your mail server and again check the end of the /var/log/maillog file on the server for errors.

If things aren't working you can send me a private message your no-ip name (assuming you don't want to make that known here publicly) and I can verify that your MX record is right using nslookup/dig and to verify that port 25 is open on your server and is not being blocked anywhere along the way.

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Post by Basher52 » Wed May 30, 2007 11:49 am

I'll do this ASAP, right now I'm too busy with other things :(
I'll get back to you

Thanks btw :)

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Post by Basher52 » Wed May 30, 2007 3:58 pm

I had to reinstall CentOS after I've been trying different things and now I can't remember what I did, lol
The OS is now CentOS 5.0

I changed a bit in the files but I can't remember if it's the same thing I did last time. I list them below.
I made a print screen of some of the no-ip screen and I upped that here: http://www.mypicshare.com/ijqkefnspic.html
This funny thing with this picture is that I've written the whole name of the server, but when you mail someone, you don't add, in this particular case, the 'ddp' do you?
just the 'servehttp.com' like: basher52@servehttp.com and not: basher52@ddp.servehttp.com or am I wrong?
I need to say that I want to use masquerade too

Oh, btw!! as this is only test so far I usually don't have the server powered up, so you better let me know some time to switch it on.

local-host-names

Code: Select all

# local-host-names - include all aliases for your machine here.
ddp.servehttp.com
localhost.localdomain
sendmail.mc

Code: Select all

divert(-1)dnl
dnl #
dnl # This is the sendmail macro config file for m4. If you make changes to
dnl # /etc/mail/sendmail.mc, you will need to regenerate the
dnl # /etc/mail/sendmail.cf file by confirming that the sendmail-cf package is
dnl # installed and then performing a
dnl #
dnl #     make -C /etc/mail
dnl #
include(`/usr/share/sendmail-cf/m4/cf.m4')dnl
VERSIONID(`setup for linux')dnl
OSTYPE(`linux')dnl
dnl #
dnl # Do not advertize sendmail version.
dnl #
dnl define(`confSMTP_LOGIN_MSG', `$j Sendmail; $b')dnl
dnl #
dnl # default logging level is 9, you might want to set it higher to
dnl # debug the configuration
dnl #
dnl define(`confLOG_LEVEL', `9')dnl
dnl #
dnl # Uncomment and edit the following line if your outgoing mail needs to
dnl # be sent out through an external mail server:
dnl #
dnl define(`SMART_HOST', `smtp.your.provider')dnl
dnl #
define(`confDEF_USER_ID', ``8:12'')dnl
dnl define(`confAUTO_REBUILD')dnl
define(`confTO_CONNECT', `1m')dnl
define(`confTRY_NULL_MX_LIST', `True')dnl
define(`confDONT_PROBE_INTERFACES', `True')dnl
define(`PROCMAIL_MAILER_PATH', `/usr/bin/procmail')dnl
define(`ALIAS_FILE', `/etc/aliases')dnl
define(`STATUS_FILE', `/var/log/mail/statistics')dnl
define(`UUCP_MAILER_MAX', `2000000')dnl
define(`confUSERDB_SPEC', `/etc/mail/userdb.db')dnl
define(`confPRIVACY_FLAGS', `authwarnings,novrfy,noexpn,restrictqrun')dnl
define(`confAUTH_OPTIONS', `A')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following allows relaying if the user authenticates, and disallows
dnl # plaintext authentication (PLAIN/LOGIN) on non-TLS links
dnl #
dnl define(`confAUTH_OPTIONS', `A p')dnl
dnl # 
dnl # PLAIN is the preferred plaintext authentication method and used by
dnl # Mozilla Mail and Evolution, though Outlook Express and other MUAs do
dnl # use LOGIN. Other mechanisms should be used if the connection is not
dnl # guaranteed secure.
dnl # Please remember that saslauthd needs to be running for AUTH. 
dnl #
dnl TRUST_AUTH_MECH(`EXTERNAL DIGEST-MD5 CRAM-MD5 LOGIN PLAIN')dnl
dnl define(`confAUTH_MECHANISMS', `EXTERNAL GSSAPI DIGEST-MD5 CRAM-MD5 LOGIN PLAIN')dnl
dnl #
dnl # Rudimentary information on creating certificates for sendmail TLS:
dnl #     cd /usr/share/ssl/certs; make sendmail.pem
dnl # Complete usage:
dnl #     make -C /usr/share/ssl/certs usage
dnl #
dnl define(`confCACERT_PATH', `/etc/pki/tls/certs')dnl
dnl define(`confCACERT', `/etc/pki/tls/certs/ca-bundle.crt')dnl
dnl define(`confSERVER_CERT', `/etc/pki/tls/certs/sendmail.pem')dnl
dnl define(`confSERVER_KEY', `/etc/pki/tls/certs/sendmail.pem')dnl
dnl #
dnl # This allows sendmail to use a keyfile that is shared with OpenLDAP's
dnl # slapd, which requires the file to be readble by group ldap
dnl #
dnl define(`confDONT_BLAME_SENDMAIL', `groupreadablekeyfile')dnl
dnl #
dnl define(`confTO_QUEUEWARN', `4h')dnl
dnl define(`confTO_QUEUERETURN', `5d')dnl
dnl define(`confQUEUE_LA', `12')dnl
dnl define(`confREFUSE_LA', `18')dnl
define(`confTO_IDENT', `0')dnl
dnl FEATURE(delay_checks)dnl
FEATURE(`no_default_msa', `dnl')dnl
FEATURE(`smrsh', `/usr/sbin/smrsh')dnl
FEATURE(`mailertable', `hash -o /etc/mail/mailertable.db')dnl
FEATURE(`virtusertable', `hash -o /etc/mail/virtusertable.db')dnl
FEATURE(redirect)dnl
FEATURE(always_add_domain)dnl
FEATURE(use_cw_file)dnl
FEATURE(use_ct_file)dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following limits the number of processes sendmail can fork to accept 
dnl # incoming messages or process its message queues to 20.) sendmail refuses 
dnl # to accept connections once it has reached its quota of child processes.
dnl #
dnl define(`confMAX_DAEMON_CHILDREN', `20')dnl
dnl #
dnl # Limits the number of new connections per second. This caps the overhead 
dnl # incurred due to forking new sendmail processes. May be useful against 
dnl # DoS attacks or barrages of spam. (As mentioned below, a per-IP address 
dnl # limit would be useful but is not available as an option at this writing.)
dnl #
dnl define(`confCONNECTION_RATE_THROTTLE', `3')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The -t option will retry delivery if e.g. the user runs over his quota.
dnl #
FEATURE(local_procmail, `', `procmail -t -Y -a $h -d $u')dnl
FEATURE(`access_db', `hash -T<TMPF> -o /etc/mail/access.db')dnl
FEATURE(`blacklist_recipients')dnl
EXPOSED_USER(`root')dnl
dnl #
dnl # For using Cyrus-IMAPd as POP3/IMAP server through LMTP delivery uncomment
dnl # the following 2 definitions and activate below in the MAILER section the
dnl # cyrusv2 mailer.
dnl #
dnl define(`confLOCAL_MAILER', `cyrusv2')dnl
dnl define(`CYRUSV2_MAILER_ARGS', `FILE /var/lib/imap/socket/lmtp')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following causes sendmail to only listen on the IPv4 loopback address
dnl # 127.0.0.1 and not on any other network devices. Remove the loopback
dnl # address restriction to accept email from the internet or intranet.
dnl #
DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Port=smtp,Addr=127.0.0.1, Name=MTA')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following causes sendmail to additionally listen to port 587 for
dnl # mail from MUAs that authenticate. Roaming users who can't reach their
dnl # preferred sendmail daemon due to port 25 being blocked or redirected find
dnl # this useful.
dnl #
dnl DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Port=submission, Name=MSA, M=Ea')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following causes sendmail to additionally listen to port 465, but
dnl # starting immediately in TLS mode upon connecting. Port 25 or 587 followed
dnl # by STARTTLS is preferred, but roaming clients using Outlook Express can't
dnl # do STARTTLS on ports other than 25. Mozilla Mail can ONLY use STARTTLS
dnl # and doesn't support the deprecated smtps; Evolution <1.1.1 uses smtps
dnl # when SSL is enabled-- STARTTLS support is available in version 1.1.1.
dnl #
dnl # For this to work your OpenSSL certificates must be configured.
dnl #
dnl DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Port=smtps, Name=TLSMTA, M=s')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following causes sendmail to additionally listen on the IPv6 loopback
dnl # device. Remove the loopback address restriction listen to the network.
dnl #
dnl DAEMON_OPTIONS(`port=smtp,Addr=::1, Name=MTA-v6, Family=inet6')dnl
dnl #
dnl # enable both ipv6 and ipv4 in sendmail:
dnl #
dnl DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Name=MTA-v4, Family=inet, Name=MTA-v6, Family=inet6')
dnl #
dnl # We strongly recommend not accepting unresolvable domains if you want to
dnl # protect yourself from spam. However, the laptop and users on computers
dnl # that do not have 24x7 DNS do need this.
dnl #
FEATURE(`accept_unresolvable_domains')dnl
dnl #
dnl FEATURE(`relay_based_on_MX')dnl
dnl # 
dnl # Also accept email sent to "localhost.localdomain" as local email.
dnl # 
LOCAL_DOMAIN(`localhost.localdomain')dnl
dnl #
dnl # The following example makes mail from this host and any additional
dnl # specified domains appear to be sent from mydomain.com
dnl #
dnl MASQUERADE_AS(`ddp.servehttp.com')dnl
dnl #
dnl # masquerade not just the headers, but the envelope as well
dnl #
dnl FEATURE(masquerade_envelope)dnl
dnl #
dnl # masquerade not just @mydomainalias.com, but @*.mydomainalias.com as well
dnl #
dnl FEATURE(masquerade_entire_domain)dnl
dnl #
dnl MASQUERADE_DOMAIN(localhost)dnl
dnl MASQUERADE_DOMAIN(localhost.localdomain)dnl
dnl MASQUERADE_DOMAIN(mydomainalias.com)dnl
dnl MASQUERADE_DOMAIN(mydomain.lan)dnl
MAILER(smtp)dnl
MAILER(procmail)dnl
dnl MAILER(cyrusv2)dnl
[/img]

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    Void Main
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    Post by Void Main » Wed May 30, 2007 6:18 pm

    Basher52 wrote:I made a print screen of some of the no-ip screen and I upped that here: http://www.mypicshare.com/ijqkefnspic.html
    This funny thing with this picture is that I've written the whole name of the server, but when you mail someone, you don't add, in this particular case, the 'ddp' do you?
    just the 'servehttp.com' like: basher52@servehttp.com and not: basher52@ddp.servehttp.com or am I wrong?
    Yes, you are wrong. :) servehttp.com is not your domain so you don't have control over the MX record for the domain. You only have a host on someone elses domain in this case so your MX record is for your specific host and thus you have to send mail to the full hostname (basher52@ddp.servehttp.com).

    When you do register your own domain (basher52.se for instance) you would create an MX record for the actual basher52.se domain and point it to your mail server (e.g. mail.basher52.se) and then you would send mail to basher52@basher52.se.

    Here are the modified files for your dynamic configuration:

    http://voidmain.is-a-geek.net/files/basher/

    Copy them into your /etc/mail directory on your server and restart your sendmail service (service sendmail restart). Check the end of your /var/log/maillog for error messages and then try and send mail to a user on your server (auser@ddp.servehttp.com).

    Your MX record is properly set up as you can see from the dig output:
    $ dig MX ddp.servehttp.com

    ; <<>> DiG 9.3.4 <<>> MX ddp.servehttp.com
    ;; global options: printcmd
    ;; Got answer:
    ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 63521
    ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 3, ADDITIONAL: 1

    ;; QUESTION SECTION:
    ;ddp.servehttp.com. IN MX

    ;; ANSWER SECTION:
    ddp.servehttp.com. 60 IN MX 5 ddp.servehttp.com.

    ;; AUTHORITY SECTION:
    servehttp.com. 86400 IN NS nf1.no-ip.com.
    servehttp.com. 86400 IN NS nf2.no-ip.com.
    servehttp.com. 86400 IN NS nf3.no-ip.com.

    ;; ADDITIONAL SECTION:
    ddp.servehttp.com. 60 IN A 82.196.123.118

    ;; Query time: 216 msec
    ;; SERVER: 127.0.0.1#53(127.0.0.1)
    ;; WHEN: Wed May 30 19:16:05 2007
    ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 127
    After you get this done let me know. I should be able to telnet to port 25 on your machine as a basic test:

    $ telnet ddp.servehttp.com 25

    If that is successful I should be able to send an email message to a user on your host. What is a valid user?

    P.S. I don't know what editor you use to edit your config files but I prefer vim for just about everything. It understands what are comments and what are configuration options and hilights them appropriately. For example, this is how your config looks when I edit it:

    http://voidmain.is-a-geek.net/files/mis ... il.mc.html

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    Post by Basher52 » Thu May 31, 2007 12:35 pm

    The server is now up and if I've understood it all correct any user that can login can also get an email, right?
    so then this would work: basher52@ddp.servehttp.com

    I tried telnet to port 25 and that worked, but basher52 won't get the mail I've sent to it. And I do check this just as a mail to root, right?
    just to type: mail

    Oh and I also use vim for all editiing, but my includes here are via cut&paste through a windoze machine, sorry


    UPDATE: I just saw this in the maillog now:
    (I scrabled the IP address)

    May 31 20:33:16 ddp sendmail[3128]: l4VIX8tR003128: x-666-xxx-66-66-66.xxxx.xx [xx.xxx.xx.xxx] did not issue MAIL/EXPN/VRFY/ETRN during connection to MTA

    oh :( this was just when i used telnet to it

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    Post by Void Main » Thu May 31, 2007 1:09 pm

    Basher52 wrote:The server is now up and if I've understood it all correct any user that can login can also get an email, right?
    so then this would work: basher52@ddp.servehttp.com

    I tried telnet to port 25 and that worked, but basher52 won't get the mail I've sent to it. And I do check this just as a mail to root, right?
    just to type: mail
    No, log in as basher52 and use any mail program (mail, pine, evolution, etc). The actual mbox file containing the incoming mail would be named /var/spool/mail/basher52.
    Oh and I also use vim for all editiing, but my includes here are via cut&paste through a windoze machine, sorry
    ewwww.
    UPDATE: I just saw this in the maillog now:
    (I scrabled the IP address)

    May 31 20:33:16 ddp sendmail[3128]: l4VIX8tR003128: x-666-xxx-66-66-66.xxxx.xx [xx.xxx.xx.xxx] did not issue MAIL/EXPN/VRFY/ETRN during connection to MTA

    oh :( this was just when i used telnet to it
    This is the message you would get if you telneted to the port and didn't do anything before disconnecting. That is good. I just sent you a message from one of my yahoo accounts, did you get it? I actually doubt you did because I can not telnet to port 25 on ddp.servehttp.com at the moment from my house.

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    Post by Basher52 » Thu May 31, 2007 2:30 pm

    Void Main wrote: No, log in as basher52 and use any mail program (mail, pine, evolution, etc). The actual mbox file containing the incoming mail would be named /var/spool/mail/basher52.
    and by this you mean that I can use the command 'mail' as I used to do for checking mails for root, like the logwatch and such?
    The other ones you're talkng about, pine evolution I don't have installed


    I knew I had forgotten something and that was to open port 25 in iptables, sorry. It was a pain... to try to test this... I VPN'd to work and tried from there, but nope, they have stoped almost everything, can't even ping anymore :(
    Tried from wifey's client, but that didn't work either untill I totally stoped her firewall THEN it worked... well after I opened port 25 that is.

    I'll try to send a mail to myself again, and so can you if you feel like it.

    btw.. what did you change in the files I download, I just saw some minor things, but that can't be it now can it?


    UPDATE: Nope no mail

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